During this time, I had to visit Minneapolis regularly because it was the HQ of the company which I worked for.

Besides the infamous Mall of America, the largest mall of U.S.A., there are some interesting cities and parks in

Minnesota.

At the end of Interstate 35 northward, it ends in the city of Duluth with Lake Superior in the backdrop.

It was surprising how cold it was in May and the coastal area of Lake Superior remained icy.

Duluth Aerial Lift Bridge was built in 1905.  The bridge span may be lifted up to allow ships sailing below.

We took a drive on the North Shore.  Lots of large ships unloaded in Lake Superior.

Gooseberry Falls State Park

Split Rock Light House in the background of the Lake Superior North Shore.

Returning from Duluth, we visited the Interstate Park near the Taylor Falls in Minnesota. 

About 1.1 billion years ago, earthquakes erupted from Taylors Falls to Lake Superior.  The hardened basalt rock from these lava flows

was partly responsible for the formation of the Dalles of the St. Croix and the bottom of the river. From 530 million years ago up until

70 million years ago, the state was washed by advancing and retreating seas.  The last glacier 10000 years ago formed both Glacial Lake Duluth,

now Lake Superior, and Glacial Lake Grantsburg, now extinct. Glacial Lake Duluth was much larger than Lake Superior is now. As this giant

body of ice thawed, its meltwaters roared south to carve out the broad valley of the St. Croix. Only very resistant basalts were able to partially

withstand the torrent, resulted in the dalles, potholes, and cliffs.  See how perfect the sidewalls!

              St. Croix River                          The largest pit is 60 feet deep and 10 feet wide!